Lamps should not be under the bed

Friends in the Lord, in the early Church, to reveal that one was a Christian meant death. It was required in those days, to worship the official gods of the Empire; keeping the same gods meant unity in the Empire, and the Emperor wanted that.
.
On certain stated days, everyone was to go to the local shrine in their town, and throw some incense on the fire to the gods. It was, in effect, a test of political loyalty. The person would then receive a certificate stating that his worship had been witnessed. We still have many of those certificates today.
.
In those days, all that a Catholic would have to do to save his skin, was go through that formal act and receive the certificate. But as we know, thousands refused and gave their life. We often hear about some of these martyrs at weekday Mass. For example St. Barbara, who even at a tender age allowed her faith in Christ to shine forth.
.
Those Christians could have concealed their religion easily, and lived quiet, private lives with no problems. But they chose instead to reveal the truth.
.
Jesus says today that a lamp is lit up brightly, and is not meant to be put under a basket or a bed. It is meant to be displayed, to illuminate everything. Truth is meant to be seen, not concealed. There may be times when stating the truth of our faith is the quickest way to become unpopular at a social gathering. But Our Lord expects us to let His Truth shine: ‘Whoever is ashamed of me and my words [in this life,] the Son of Man will be ashamed of when he comes in his glory.
.
There may be times when it is dangerous to speak out as a Catholic. But such moments, that risk ridicule, or mockery, or death – these are the moments of our glory on this earth. ‘No one lights a lamp and puts it under a basket or a bed, Instead they put it on its stand, so that it gives light to all in the house.’ ‘In the same way, let your light shine before others.’
.
We are called to show forth the truth, and to align our life with it.

Comments are closed.

Post Navigation